Bruce Block has had a passion for drag racing for many years, dating back to when he made his first trip to spectate when he was 12-years-old. After a few years went by, Block got his hands on a 1968 Pontiac GTO.

After many rebellious nights, he started to gain experience, and skill at drag racing. “When I got this car in high school, I used to sneak out to the track without my parents knowing.” said Block. “I would do pretty good, usually winning or runner up every night.” Needless to say, Block had been bitten by a very big power bug and hadn’t even realized it yet.

Block surrounded himself with horsepower as a kid, it was only a matter of time before he got something extreme of his own.

After a few years of fun, Block decided to step out of the drag racing scene to start a family, but that didn’t stop him from following and above all loving it. Slowly getting back into the automotive industry, Block restored a 1993 first-generation Ram to take to shows.

In the summer of 2004, Block made it to his first event with his restoration. This event, in particular, it was an all diesel event which included a dyno competition and a drag race. “I had no idea diesels could make so much power or go that fast,” Block explained.

In the 2004-2005 season, Block found out he had the quickest common rail truck in the country, running in the low 12 seconds.

He witnessed one of the first 10-second, 1/4-mile time passes that day by Dennis Perry. Ultimately, that’s what got him back into racing again. In the fall of 2004 Block ordered his cherry red ram.

Like anything, it became a competition to see who could push their weekend warriors further and faster. The modifications kept coming and the truck became faster every time out. Block changed up turbochargers and fueling systems regularly to try and set the bar higher.

Fuel cell, dual transmission coolers, and nitrous oxide were an absolute must for “QUIKDZL”

In 2006, he installed the PPE Dual Fueler setup, bigger turbocharger, injectors, and ran 11.60 in the 1/4-mile. Then after installing nitrous oxide, he bettered the time to an 11.20. “It was a competition between Wade Moody, Mike Dreaver, and myself to see who would be the first common rail truck to break into the 10s,” continued Block. We were informed that Dreaver got there first, but Block was only a week behind to reach that milestone.

Block wasn’t the first common rail truck into the 10-second range, but he has piloted this truck to three national championships in the Diesel Motorsports Unlimited Class. He also has numerous placements in the Outlaw Diesel Super Series and NHRDA through the years.

Shown is Bruce’s “race-ready” engine bay equipped with dual cp3 pumps, electric fans, aluminum valve cover, and an oversize turbocharger.

So how fast did he get down the track? Block filled us in, “In 2012, I had the truck set up to hit the 9-second range, I expected it to run about a 9.95.” Looking back, nobody had ever even heard 9-second range in the diesel industry.

“I was pretty excited that day,” Block explained. “I went out and set a personal best with a 9.62.” He mentioned he had never expected that kind of time to be on his slip, but was glad it did. “This truck is a constant evolution,” Block continued. “I keep trying to come up with things to make it faster.” To date, his best elapsed time has been 6.06 at 118 mph in the 1/8-mile and a 9.49 at 149 mph in the 1/4-mile.

Block has kept his truck up with all the required safety rules to make him legal. Do you blame him? Strapping into a 6,500-pound rocket ship we would do the same.

This project will never be complete and Block will tell you himself he’s got plans for this truck. He plans on taking this red hot Ram into the five-second range in the 1/8-mile. Block has been a true pioneer and innovator for the sport and assures us that it couldn’t have been possible without all the help along the way.

Block proudly thanks all the past and present sponsors HTS Transmissions, MJ Tool and Fab, Fass Fuel Systems, Bullseye Power Turbos, Fluidampr, ISSPRO Gauges, Smarty Tuners, Exergy Performance, and Gregg Wright for helping him keep this monster running.

Do you have what it takes to hammer down and drive a truck like this down the track? Let us know in the comments below!