Getting Tanked With Titan: Titan Tank Install On A 2015 Chevy 3500

A titan is a thing or being of great strength, so it’s no wonder that Titan Fuel Tanks is known for building some tough replacement fuel tanks on the market. When diesel truck owners called out for larger fuel capacity without affecting cargo room, Titan answered. With their goal in mind, their top engineers set out to meet the needs of the customers and the result was exceptional – a new lightweight stock replacement tank that nearly doubles the capacity of OEM tanks, and is stronger than steel.

They’re so strong, in fact, that they earned an unbeatable lifetime warranty. The key to their extraordinary strength is the cross-linked polymer XLHDPE material that the tanks are made out of. Cross-linked is a process similar to how carbon fiber is made. Strands of the material are woven together to create each tank.

A lift is not needed for this install, but it definitely helps. Mike Deford from Titan estimated it takes about “two and a half hours to install the tank with a lift, or three hours without a lift.”

When asked about Titan’s materials, Mike Deford explained: “Our polymer material creates a tank that is very tough and very rugged. The material does not rust or corrode, and it is very light. Add all of these things together, and you have the Titan fuel tank.”

A Closer Look

The Titan fuel tank is a complete package. The kit includes factory style tank straps, new support brackets, rubber cushions, and all of the required hardware.

Titan makes a wide variety of tanks for numerous applications. Even the gas burners are included with tanks small enough to fit in the beds of Tacomas, Rangers, and Jeeps. Titan Fuel Tanks have benefits beyond just the extra capacity. One of them is light weight (PN, with their long-bed tanks weighing in at under 50 pounds.

Titan’s pride in their product is the driving force behind their constant evolution. They make installations easier only requiring basic tools, allow all the factory lines to reconnect with no headaches, and include all required hardware. Additionally, they only hang down up to 2.5 inches lower than the stock tank, depending on the application. And last but not least, all Titan tanks are CARB compliant, and all emissions equipment is kept intact.

For our project, a 2015 Chevy crew cab one-ton, we used Titan’s Super Series (PN 7010313) tank kit. Titan provides everything necessary to make your install as easy and complete as possible. The Super Series is an extra heavy-duty midship tank that is made specifically for a crew cab long bed with a one-piece driveshaft. It fits certain 2500 and 3500 models from 2013-16. This tanks boasts a 60-gallon capacity, 26 more gallons than the factory tank, and is a direct replacement.

The stock tank sits in position prior to its removal.

Installation

As with any installation, it pays to be mindful of safety, especially when dealing with fuel and handling awkward and heavy parts like a fuel tank. It’s definitely a good idea to tackle this project with less than a quarter tank of fuel, as this will lighten the tank and reduce sloshing.

With the truck on the lift, we were ready to begin. We started by disconnecting the filler neck while the truck was lowered down. Next, we raised the truck up to a manageable working height and removed the driveshaft to give us plenty of room to work and maneuver the tank out and in. We supported the tank with a transmission jack and started to loosen the tank straps. This gave us access to the lines and electrical connections. We were careful not to damage any of them, while also watching the tank’s balance.

Out with the old, in with the new. You can really see the size difference between the 60-gallon Titan tank and the 34-gallon stock unit. This is a 213% increase in storage capacity and along with the XLDHPE construction, makes the Titan tank a tougher, more helpful fuel tank.

Now, we started swapping the factory components over to the new Titan tank. These included the filler neck and sending unit. Unfortunately, the stock tank shield was no longer usable, but Titan does sell a new shield designed specifically to fit the application (PN 0299008).

The Titan tank uses an o-ring for an easier sending unit install.

With the o-ring in place, we installed the sending unit into the tank. This allows for an easier and faster way to change sending units when the factory one fails, as opposed to the locking ring that requires a hammer and a screwdriver to unlock the sending unit from the tank.

We clearanced the stock support bracket to make room for the new HD tank.

Next, we carefully cut the support bracket for the tank. We were careful of the metal lines that ran parallel to the frame rail. Our components were transferred over to the new tank, and the new support mounted on the frame, so we were ready to install the new tank.

We raised the new tank into place, allowing enough room to reconnect our fuel lines and electrical connections. We then raised it up to get the straps locked into place in the frame and bolted them in to secure the empty tank. It’s a good idea to leave the new support mount loose until the tank is secured in place with the straps to ensure proper alignment. After making sure all the connections and mounting hardware were tightened to their proper torque, we reinstalled the driveshaft. Finally, we lowered the truck and installed the filler neck.

Final Thoughts

The Titan tank reuses the stock tank strap locations, accompanied with a new support bracket.

We caught up with the owner, Chris Gardner, some time after the install to get his thoughts on the tank. When asked how he was liking it, he simply said it was “Awesome.” He went on to say how he’s able to go “four hundred miles and still have roughly an eighth of a tank left.” This, compared to before, when he could only go 200 miles on a trip, makes the Titan tank a resounding upgrade for his needs. Even when unloaded, he says he averages about five hundred miles per fill-up.

Metal tanks are heavy and welded together, and those welds create places for rust to start. Welds also break. A metal tank can seem good at first glance but quality does suffer at a low price.

With more range and better durability than the stock tank, this Titan-equipped Duramax dually is ready to go the distance, and then some!

So whether you’re a “hot shot” hauling goods cross country, or taking equipment across town, a larger fuel capacity means fewer stops and more time on the road to get the job done sooner. If more gallons per fill-up, a stronger-than-factory construction, and well-designed improvements are what you’re looking for, then don’t hesitate to visit Titan’s website or reach out to them through their Facebook page.

Article Sources

About the author

Aaron Roth

Aaron eats, sleeps, and breathes trucks. If he isn't out looking for ways to get more power out of his twin-turbo 12-valve Cummins, he's getting wild in the mud with his 1978 Chevy.
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